What is Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS)« Back to Questions List

Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is a combination of symptoms that many women get about a week or two before their period. 

Some women get their periods without any signs of PMS or only very mild symptoms. For others, PMS symptoms may be so severe that it makes it hard to do everyday activities like go to work or school. Severe PMS symptoms may be a sign of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). PMS goes away when you no longer get a period, such as after menopause. After pregnancy, PMS might come back, but you might have different PMS symptoms.

PMS may happen more often in women who:

  • Have high levels of stress
  • Have a family history of depression
  • Have a personal history of either postpartum depression or depression

PMS symptoms may get worse as you reach your late 30s or 40s and approach menopause and are in the transition to menopause, called perimenopause.

This is especially true for women whose moods are sensitive to changing hormone levels during the menstrual cycle. In the years leading up to menopause, your hormone levels also go up and down in an unpredictable way as your body slowly transitions to menopause. You may get the same mood changes, or they may get worse.

PMS stops at menopause when you no longer get a period.

Source: WomensHealth.Gov

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Asked on July 4, 2021 8:53 pm